high dynamic range

HDR Color Grading Solutions

HDR COLOR GRADING FACILITY IN DUBAI, UAE

HDR requires high contrast with deep blacks & bright whites, not just brighter pixels. Simply making a scene brighter isn’t the solution and can skew the creative intent of a scene. 

Different types of content (theatrical, live sports, local news, and music videos), benefit from different approaches. An old TV show (vintage color correction) does not require the same level of remastering for HDR that a new theatrical release would require. Creating content now in HDR provides greater flexibility, even if the final delivery format is not HDR. Expanding the dynamic range of content to improve the experience while preserving artistic intent is what we do best. Our services include a range of solutions for both existing libraries and new content creation from camera original RAW content.

HDR color grading services are available at Pixel House post production facilities in Dubai, UAE. Projects will be graded to the HDR specifications set forth by the UHD Alliance by colorist Sudip Shrestha.

Mail : Sudip@pixelhouse.ae for booking a schedule.

FIRST HDR VIDEO CAMERA - Contrast's AMP HDR

High Dynamic Range Camera - 17+f stops

High Dynamic Range Camera - 17+f stops

Contrast’s amp®HDR camera system is the most efficient HDR video system in the world. Combine the ampHDR camera with our proprietary (developed in-house), real-time merging and tone-mapping algorithms and an HDR monitor, and the integrated system produces and displays accurate, real-life scenes with displayed luminance ranges that go far beyond what is possible with any other camera.

The HDR system employs Contrast’s patented amp image-splitting and combining technology to compose a single video stream from multiple sensors. The video stream can be recorded raw or tone mapped (to 8 bits per color for standard display, 10 bits for HDMI Deep Color, or 16 bits for HDR display) and output via HDMI, DVI, HD-SDI or other formats. Contrast’s merging algorithm — a proprietary mix of real time merging, blending and horsepower — handles exposure separations of 5 stops or more. 

Contrast’s amp technology provides unsurpassed image quality, especially when lighting is difficult to control:

  • Medical endoscopy
  • Manufacturing inspection, evaluation and quality control
  • Industrial welding, molding and cutting processes
  • Military imaging systems for tracking and recording
  • Security and surveillance
  • Scientific experiments
  • Film and video: sports events, nature documentaries
  • Underwater photography
  • Real estate – portable real time video displays
  • Consumer cell phone cameras and digital cameras

LEARN HDR - Tery Ratchliff

Trey Ratcliff is a pioneer High Dynamic Range photographer. HDR photography is a new paradigm in art that creates images like no one has ever seen before. The first HDR photograph to hang in the Smithsonian was Trey's. He has been featured on ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, and the BBC, and his photos have accumulated more than 50 million views on Flickr and SmugMug.

Trey Ratcliff is a pioneer High Dynamic Range photographer. HDR photography is a new paradigm in art that creates images like no one has ever seen before. The first HDR photograph to hang in the Smithsonian was Trey's. He has been featured on ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, and the BBC, and his photos have accumulated more than 50 million views on Flickr and SmugMug.

HDR is short for High Dynamic Range. It is a post-processing task of taking either one image or a series of images, combining them, and adjusting the contrast ratios to do things that are virtually impossible with a single aperture and shutter speed.

An HDR image is commonly made by taking three photos of the same scene, each at different shutter speeds. The result is a bright, medium, and dark photo, based on the amount of light that got through the lens. A software process then combines all the photos to bring details to the shadows and highlights both. This helps to achieve the same task in the final photograph that the human eye can accomplish on the scene.

And yes, you can make an HDR out of a single photo as well.

Find more tutorials at Tery Ratchliff offical website and blog.
www.stuckincustoms.com